Saturday, December 21, 2013

Rome Unit Study - Roman Numeral Bingo

Week 6: We played Roman Numeral Bingo.

Roman numerals are still used sometimes. Clocks and dates are common places to find them. Knowing how to read them makes it more fun to discover Roman Numerals.
Before playing Roman Numeral Bingo we talked about the ancient city of Pompeii. The kids read the books Pompeii...... Buried Alive, Vacation Under the Volcano and The Buried City of Pompeii and watched the video How The Earth Was Made..... Vesuvius.

The main focus of the video was the science of Vesuvius. Today the lava chamber under the volcano far exceeds its footprint and it is still active. When it erupts, it will not be a good day for the city of Naples. It obviously shows the horror of the day so I would recommending previewing this video before showing it to children.

Then we played Roman Numeral Bingo. Please feel free to print the game for personal or classroom use.

First we went over a few basics of Roman Numerals.
I=1          V=5
X=10       L=50
C=100     D=500
M=1000


Roman Numerals are built with place value. Numbers 1-8 are built with the letters I and V. Tens values of 1-8 (10, 20, 30,....80) are built with the X and L. Hundreds values of 1-8 (100, 200, 300,...800) are built with the C and D. Thousands values are built with the M.

Nines are made from the letters in the first column; I, X, C and M. IX=9, XC=90, CM=900.

Looking at the letters that make up the place value digit, a smaller letter value preceding a larger letter value means subtract. For example; XL = 50-10 = 40. A larger letter value followed by a smaller letter value means add. For example; DCC=500+100+100 = 700.

The word ROMAN is printed across the top of the Bingo board.
The R column contains the values 1-9.
The O column contains the values 10-99.
The M column contains the values 100-999.
The A column contains the values 1000-4000.
The N column contains all numbers.

Reading the winning numbers back was an added challenge.







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3 comments:

  1. Very neat challenge! Thanks for sharing it with Afterschool!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I still remember watching a TV special about an ancient volcano eruption when I was a kid... it was terrifying! Fascinating history, though. Love your idea for teaching Roman numerals. This can be a tough concept. Thanks for linking up at After School!

    ReplyDelete

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